Spay/Neuter

Our OK Humane Place Clinic has moved! Our new location is at 6002 S. Western Avenue, Oklahoma City, OK.

To contact the OK Humane Place Spay/Neuter Clinic, call (405) 947-7729

Spaying or neutering your pet is an important decision for pet owners. As animal lovers who value our pets, it is important to understand the impact of this decision.

It happens everywhere.

In every community, in every state, there are homeless animals. In the U.S. as a whole, there are an estimated 6-8 million homeless animals entering animal shelters every year. About half of these animals are adopted, and tragically, the other half are euthanized. These are healthy, sweet pets who would have made great companions.

The Oklahoma City Animal Shelter takes in around 32,000 animals every year. These are not the offspring of homeless “street” animals—these are the puppies and kittens of cherished family pets and even purebreds.

Yes, your pet’s offspring could be shelter animals!

Many people believe that their pet’s puppies or kittens would never become homeless shelter animals. But the reality is that every time the dog finds his way under the fence to visit the neighbor’s female dog, or the indoor/outdoor cat comes back home pregnant again, the result is a litter of dogs or cats. Even if they are placed into homes, it is still possible for them to end up in shelters once they become “hard to handle,” or for them to reproduce further and for the next generation of puppies or kittens to wind up homeless.

Even if you find “good homes” for your pet’s babies, how do you know what THOSE people will do? Will they spay or neuter their new pet? Will their pet’s offspring (your pet’s grandchildren) end up in shelters? How many shelter deaths could your ONE unspayed animal be responsible for?

Many people are surprised to learn that nationwide more than 3 million cats and dogs are euthanized in shelters. Spay/neuter is the only permanent, 100-percent effective method of birth control for dogs and cats.

Millions of pet deaths each year are a needless tragedy. By spaying and neutering your pet, you can be an important part of the solution. Call the OK Humane Place Spay/Neuter Clinic to make an appointment at (405) 947-7729.

Still have questions?

Click on the arrow next to a question to see the answer.

“I want my children to see the miracle of birth.”

Children may learn about the birthing process in far simpler and less costly ways. Plenty of books, videotapes, CDs, and DVDs are available that portray the miracle of birth in a wide range of animals, providing a far greater appreciation of the process than can be gained through watching a single dog or cat deliver a single litter. Maybe even try a visit to a farm or a zoo if you're interested in seeing a live delivery. Do your part by having your pet spayed or neutered. You'll be saving more than just one life!

“If I find homes for my pets’ litters then I won’t contribute to the problem, right?”

Wrong. Only a certain number of people want pets. So every home you find for your pet's offspring takes away a home from a loving animal already at a shelter.

“Doesn’t spaying and neutering interfere with nature?”

Domesticated dogs and cats are completely dependent on humans. It's our responsibility as their guardians to make sure the number of companion animals born doesn't exceed the number of available homes.

“Should my female dog be allowed to have one litter?”

There's no reason for a female dog to have even one litter. It won't make her a better companion, and it will increase the likelihood that she will develop mammary cancer. Spaying a dog before she goes into heat even once greatly reduces the risk of her developing mammary cancer.

“Will spaying or neutering make my pet fat?”

Removing the ovaries or testicles does affect metabolism. For this reason, spayed or neutered pets will tend to put on weight more easily if permitted to overeat. The important phrase here is "if permitted to overeat." The diet of every cat and dog should be carefully regulated to prevent him/her from becoming overweight.

“Will it change my pet’s intelligence or disposition?”

Only for the better. Spaying and neutering have no effect on intelligence. Most spayed and neutered pets tend to be gentler and more affectionate. They become less interested in other animals and spend more time interacting with their owners.

“When should my pet have the operation?”

Generally speaking, as early as possible. Pets don’t understand the concept of "planned parenthood" and as soon as your pet becomes sexually mature, he/she is capable of producing a potentially unwanted litter. Although traditionally veterinarians have recommended spaying/neutering around 6 months of age, prepubertal (8 to 12 weeks of age) spaying/neutering has gained increasing support among veterinarians. Most veterinarians recommend that females be spayed before their first estrus or "heat" period to maximize the procedure’s cancer-sparing benefits. Because all pets are individuals, talk to your veterinarian about the best time to neuter your particular pet.

“Is the operation painful?”

Spaying or neutering is performed under general anesthesia and, therefore, your pet does not feel pain during the procedure. After surgery there may be some discomfort, but this is part of the normal healing process, does not last long, and can be controlled with medication.

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